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mamun 123
Jun 15, 2022
In Welcome to the Forum
In capital markets, paid memberships, subscriptions — or simply "super memberships" — have always been great stories. In the US, at least Amazon, Netflix, and Costco have all executive list made money off this story. There are also many domestic companies that have started paid membership and subscription membership based on the traditional free membership executive list system, but there are very few companies that can really tell this story well. Let's take a look and see what went wrong with the subscription system, paid membership system, and super membership system of domestic companies. With reference to the experience of these successful predecessors abroad. 1. Discounted membership fees - false promises are delivered from the membership executive list fee One of the interesting points about the US version of Super Member is that the membership fee is almost never discounted, and even increases the price every few years, such as: The executive list annual fee of Amazon Prime in the United States has been upgraded from the earliest 79 to 99, and then to the current 119; Netflix offers different prices according to different resolutions, and now the monthly price is 8.99, 13.99 and 17.99, and its last price increase was in December 2020. Costco membership cards also rose from 55 and 110 to 60 and 120 on June 1, 2017. At the same time, you will not see the American version executive list of the super membership model with games like "buy one year get one year free" and "buy two years and get 30% off". On the contrary, American-style super members provide more benefits, and consumers pre-order executive list at low prices for these benefits. Taking Amazon Prime, which costs 119 a year, as an example, JP Morgan data shows that the corresponding equity value is close to 800. And Amazon will continue to superimpose new services into the Prime system, which conveys the promise of value.
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mamun 123

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